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Windows 8 updates can be included in software updates and should be installed, even if you have not upgraded to 8.

I've been using Windows 7 since 2010. And I'll follow your advice about when to update to Windows 8. My problem is that the Revo Uninstaller program I paid for several months ago is now asking me to accept a Revo Update (for free, I assume) that is compatible with Windows 8. I asked Revo support my question, which they did not answer. Namely, should I accept that update while I'm still using Windows 7?

In this excerpt from Answercast #72, I look at why it's a good idea to accept Windows 8 updates for software packages, even if you are not yet running 8.

Windows 8 updates

This actually applies to more software than just Revo Uninstaller, which by the way, I happen to recommend and use from time to time myself.

Getting ready for 8

Many software packages are basically getting ready for Windows 8, even though we're not already using Windows 8 in most cases.

In almost all cases the right thing to do is go ahead and accept the update. Basically, it's just another update that probably fixes a few problems - and by the way, makes the program run with Windows 8.

If it's running on Windows 7, that's fine. That part of the update won't bother you, it won't get in your way. It's the other stuff that's maybe coming with it.

Updates fix bugs

Normally, these kinds of updates include more than just one major fix or one major thing. On top of that, it may be that the software will require that this update be in place before future updates are applied. Those future updates may be fixing more things than just Windows 8 compatibility.

So, the bottom line, the simple line is to go ahead and accept the updates - even if they appear to be something that's specific for Windows 8.

Even if you're running Windows 7, or Vista, or XP, keeping the software as up to date as possible in general is the safest thing - and my recommendation.

Article C6059 - November 22, 2012 « »

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Leo Leo A. Notenboom has been playing with computers since he was required to take a programming class in 1976. An 18 year career as a programmer at Microsoft soon followed. After "retiring" in 2001, Leo started Ask Leo! in 2003 as a place for answers to common computer and technical questions. More about Leo.

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3 Comments
John
November 22, 2012 2:05 PM

I note in your answer you again recommend Revo
Uninstaller.
However I had the free version and decided to have the free trial of the Pro version but for some reason before the trial period was up it said it was and giving me no access to it.
Emails to Revo went unanswered and so I have stuck with the free version.
I have found this to be poor as a search of the registry after an uninstall still finds entries of the item uninstalled.
I would hope Pro is better but as stated I have not had the chance to give it a proper trial.

Tony
November 23, 2012 1:17 PM

Only advantages of pro over free is it has force uninstall and is full 64 bit compatible. otherwise if you dont have 64 bit windows then stay with free. if you do and want to remove 64 bit programs then upgrade to pro you will be happy you did.

Bevin
November 23, 2012 4:36 PM

I have a similar issue with XP running MS Office 2003. MS recommended updates include those for MS Office 2007, which I don't install. Do I need to?

I'm reluctant to say you should take updates for software you don't have, but in Windows Update's case they're pretty darned good about identifying what you actually need. In your shoes, I'd take it. Maybe backup first, if you don't already, just in case.
Leo
25-Nov-2012

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