Helping people with computers... one answer at a time.

Some research reveals that this may be the result of malware infecting the machine. Up-to-date virus tools should solve the problem.

I'm using Windows 7 Ultimate with all of the available updates installed. When running Windows back up, the back up aborts when 97% done with a code of "0x810000037." What's wrong?

In this excerpt from Answercast #16, I look at the 0x810000037 error and what to do next.

Aborted Backup

I did a little bit of research on this and I'm including a link with this transcript to an answer out on Microsoft.com.

The theory is that of all things - it's malware.

The answer that's out there seems to indicate that a particular form of java-based malware can cause exactly this behavior. Make sure that Microsoft Security Essentials is up-to-date and up to the latest, then you can resolve the problem.

It will find malware that's on your machine, remove it and after doing so, the backup will complete.

Keep virus software up-to-date

My recommendation, in general, for most of these kinds of solutions (of course!) is to always make sure you are running up-to-date anti-malware software. Make sure that you're running it regularly and you're running anti-malware software that is recognized as good (and recommended by others.)

I have my own page of recommendations of which Microsoft Security Essentials is currently top on my list.

It's just one of those things that whenever you encounter an unexpected problem like this, it's worth making sure that all of those boxes are checked; that all of these things are being done:

  • That you are running anti-virus software.
  • You're running anti-spyware software.
  • You're behind a firewall.
  • That all the software that you're doing this with is as up-to-date as possible.

So, give that a try. Chances are removing some malware will simply take care of the problem for you.

 

Article C5322 - May 10, 2012 « »

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Leo Leo A. Notenboom has been playing with computers since he was required to take a programming class in 1976. An 18 year career as a programmer at Microsoft soon followed. After "retiring" in 2001, Leo started Ask Leo! in 2003 as a place for answers to common computer and technical questions. More about Leo.

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